Connect with us

Kev's Best

Trump threatens to close the border with Mexico to block the flow of migrants

International

Trump threatens to close the border with Mexico to block the flow of migrants

President Trump has threatened to deploy the army on the border between the two countries to drive back thousands of migrants from Central America, many hoping to reach the United States.

Three weeks before the mid-term elections, Donald Trump picked up one of his favorite campaign themes – Border Security – in a series of furious tweets on Thursday, castigating Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador

In particular, he called on Mexico to intercept migrants.

I must, in the strongest terms, ask Mexico to stop this attack – and if it is not able, I will call the US military and CLOSE OUR SOUTH FRONTIERE!

Donald Trump, President of the United States

Amalgamating migrants and crime, he also criticized the leaders of the first three countries for doing too little “to stop the huge influx of people, including several criminals”, reiterating his threat to cut off the financial aid granted to them by Washington.

At the same time, he appeared to be threatening to end the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (SCMTA), which the three partners have just concluded.

“The assault on our country on the southern border, including the criminal elements and the DRUGS who are flocking, are much more important to me, as president, than trade and the AEUMC,” he warned.

The fault of the democrats

Marcelo Ebrard, appointed Mexican foreign minister by President-elect Manuel Lopez Obrador, downplayed the US president’s remarks, saying he was addressing his electoral base in the run-up to the November 6 mid-term elections.

Since taking office in January 2017, the Trump administration has tightened US migration policy.

So far, however, he has not managed to get Congress to vote money to deliver on his flagship promise to build a wall on the border with Mexico. Frustrated by this blockage, he ordered the deployment of the National Guard at the border last April to ensure security.

Thousands of Central American migrants continue their exodus

At the end of last week’s San Pedro Sula, one of the most dangerous cities in Honduras, the migrant caravan has seen its ranks grow as it travels to El Salvador and Guatemala.

There is no official assessment of their numbers, but the media estimates that there are thousands of migrants fleeing violence and poverty.

After spending the night as refuges in the Guatemalan capital, hundreds of them have undertaken to travel the 250 km that still separates them from the city of Tecun Uman, on the border with the Mexican state of Chiapas.

Another group had not yet reached the city of Guatemala.

Mexico has deployed additional police resources on its border with Guatemala.

The Mexican authorities have indicated that Hondurans would not be allowed to enter the country all together and that they should present a passport and a visa – documents that few possess – or apply for refugee status, a process which could take 90 days.

Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales said Wednesday that his country is working with humanitarian organizations to help migrants by providing food and shelter.

As in Guatemala and El Salvador, the gangs are terrorists in Honduras, where 68 percent of the 9 million people live below the poverty line. Honduras is considered one of the most violent countries in the world, with a daily average of 20 murders per day.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) called for “respect for the rights of all migrants, especially the most vulnerable”.

More than 500,000 Latin Americans are illegally crossing the southern border of Mexico every year to try to get back to the United States, according to UN figures.

Pompeo takes back the pilgrim’s staff

Just back from Turkey and Saudi Arabia , where he tried to take stock of the disappearance of Saudi Arabian Jamal Khashoggi, Foreign Secretary Mike Pompeo is due to visit Panama on Thursday and then Mexico the next day.

He will meet Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela and the outgoing Mexican President, Enrique Pena Nieto, to discuss, inter alia, illegal immigration and “illegal movement of money, arms and drugs”, according to a statement from the department. State.

Continue Reading
You may also like...
Brett Delray

Brett Delray was born and raised in London. As a journalist, Brett has contributed to many online publications including BBC, The Daily Mail and NPR. In regards to academics, Bill earned a degree in business from The London School of Journalism. Brett covers economy stories here Kev's Best.

More in International

To Top